Cirrus sr22 - inside a real emergency over illinois - electrical failure

Niko's Wings

👍5993 👁494957

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After Oshkosh 2018, Miss Grace needed some repairs. A Cirrus Center at Chicago Executive airport changed the starter adapter, the faulty EGT probe and the battery, plus adjusted the prop governor and did an oil change as well. As you will see many compound issues led to me declaring an emergency about 40 minutes South of Chicago. The suspicion of a very serious electrical problem was very vivid in my mind and it turned out to be a very true situation that I'm glad I got myself out of. What would you do in this situation? Would you have continued the flight with only Alternator 2? Would you not declare an emergency? Share your opinion. Special thanks to ATC for their great help and the nice people at Danville airport for going out of their way to help out as much as they could. Also, I need to mention how incredibly supportive Cirrus has been for me and Miss Grace while dealing with this issue. I cannot thank Cirrus Aircraft enough for being there and giving me access to their top engineers. Thank you for watching! -------------------------------------------------------------------- I am NOT a Certified Flight Instructor and my videos are not for instruction purposes. The video is intended for my own personal experiences and for entertainment purposes only. Do not use my video content as information about how to fly an airplane. To properly learn how to fly you MUST visit your local flight school and work with an experienced Certified Flight Instructor. Music by Epidemic Sound ( follow me on: Instagram
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Aviation, Cirrus sr22, Sr22, Flying airplanes, Private pilot, Air traffic, General aviation, Ifr flying, Flight vlog, Atc audio, Air traffic control, Small plane, Control tower, Instrument pilot, Airplane emergency, Cirrus emergency, Aircraft emergency, Emergency landing, Cross country emergency, Inflight emergency, Forced landing, Electrical failure.
View Comments
Stefan Drury
Stefan Drury

Firstly, great to have you safely on the ground mate, that was brilliantly handled and you were really calm through the whole event. And secondly, great job putting this video together and sharing it with the community here. I'm going to share this with my maintenance team so we can hopefully prevent something similar happening on the aircraft here. Once again thanks for making this video. Stay safe mate, stef.

2018-10-20
Tony Merlot
Tony Merlot

Safety first...First airport asap! Absolutely!😯

2018-10-22
Dean Brown
Dean Brown

I am an active CFI as well as an Air Traffic Controller who is currently working on a project to improve ATC emergency assistance. Great job, thanks for sharing so that all can learn. By all means declare an emergency if you feel it is needed. Great job squawking 7700, which is underused by many pilots. This helps us (ATC) in several ways that many pilots might not appreciate, including letting other ATC facilities besides the one working your aircraft know that the facility talking to you is busy with an emergency. Also, most controllers will NOT understand what "ALT 1" is so please do NOT abbreviate. Finally, if a situation begins to develop please let ATC know early if possible so that we can get ahead of the problem.

2018-10-30
Smitty Smithsonite
Smitty Smithsonite

REALLY glad that didn't end up a fire! Nice job handling the situation - calm, cool, and collected. All GREAT pilot qualities. As soon I heard the static and saw your concern, I knew it was either a bad alternator (sometimes a failed rectifier bridge will cause excess AC current to enter the system, causing all kinds of strange things to happen with electronics), loose battery terminal on either positive or negative, or an electrical short. I've had these things happen in automobiles over the years - almost same symptoms with the FM radio. I've been an auto and small engine mechanic for many years. Never worked on aircraft, but the basic systems are the same for the most part. Last week in fact, the alternator died in our '86 Grand Marquis. My wife said the FM radio started fading in and out, and the wipers were real slow. Battery had 12.12 volts when I checked it, and key-on it dropped to 11.87v - pretty spanked. Love those older cars - modern radio wouldn't work right, yet the computer-controlled engine kept running! Any car built in the last 20 years wouldn't have fared as well. The newer they are, the more sensitive they are to low voltage. Must be something in the air for alternators lately! Glad this worked out ok, and THANK YOU for sharing this, Niko - an EXCELLENT learning experience for pilots, and non-pilots alike. 👍👍

2018-10-21
A Google user
A Google user

I’m an MEI-I. I (if it were me, not you) wouldn’t (and haven’t) have declared an emergency, for sure. This has happened to me in many different flight environments, including in Class B. You’re in beautiful VFR over Illinois, land of many uncontrolled airports. You also shouldn’t transmit much, as this is the biggest draw. Next time shutdown whatever, descend & squawk VFR. ATC can’t help you with all the General Aviation flying locally (minus some Class D airport). You’ve got a running engine and known fuel levels, too. A mistake I see is the lack of paper charts as a backup. Also, did this airplane come with checklists in written form as a backup (not on a screen)? You don’t know local airports, their freqs, or all the other data you’ve become complacent about with all your electronics. You end up freely talking on the radio as if you’re the only airplane, also. Glad you got down safe and you did EXACTLY what I would have taught a student. I think you would have been fine in any case (lose ALL electronics), as you handled this very calmly.

2018-10-22
Rjh Rhjj
Rjh Rhjj

Do you have a handheld radio? If not it might not be a bad idea to get one. Usually there's a headset adapter available. Obviously your radios stayed operational but you never know. I'm glad you are safe Niko. Thanks for the video.

2018-10-19
bob4jjjj
bob4jjjj

You made the right call, but I think I might have made it a bit earlier, but hindsight is a great thing. You got down before anything bad happened and you are ok, that is what matters in the end. Do yo think it was caused by the work done earlier? You might not want to answer that, but appears strange that it happened just after you had work done. It might not have been their fault anyway, a loose wire moving slightly and not seen at the time is all it takes. Safe flying.

2018-10-19
Ward Holbrook
Ward Holbrook

Well handled Captain Niko. As for comments, let me put on my CFI and ATP hats... As a veteran of a few emergencies over the years myself including an inflight electrical fire, I think you handled yourself very well - a sign of good initial and recurrent training. My only critiques would be that you told ATC that you had lost "Alt 1". I sure he was asking himself what is an "Alt 1"? (Most controllers are not pilots.) Being that descriptive may not have been the best choice of wording to ATC. I would think that the better choice would have been to say that you had lost your alternator. He did figure it out, but other than that (very) minor detail, I believe the communications side of the event was handled very well. The other critique would be that I didn't see you pull out and refer to the checklist. Even if (especially if) you've got it all memorized, it's always good technique and procedure to pull out the checklist just to make sure nothing was missed. Please don't mind my critiques, but all good pilots and crews do post flight debriefs and self critiques after each flight. If that was myself in your video, those would be the comments that I'd be telling myself. All in all, a very good job, I think you did yourself proud. Good on you!

2018-10-22
Nancy Bradshaw CFI & Commercial Pilot
Nancy Bradshaw CFI & Commercial Pilot

Good job on staying calm, the potential for a fire is definitely scary. Since you have all glass, loosing electrics is an issue. Also, I’m not familiar with the SR22, but that engine working is depended as well on electrics, has a FADEC right? You made great use of all your resources, ATC helped you out for sure. I’ve mainly flown Cessna’s and have also dealt with an alternator failure but didn’t find it a big deal since I knew the engine would keep running and it was just the radio and flaps in that case. Had an engine failure 3 miles form an airport once at night, also in a 172. That was a bit nerve wrecking. Thanks for sharing that experience, great video

2018-10-19
Windtee
Windtee

When in doubt, keep calm and put it down. Great share. Thanks, Niko!

2018-10-22
Danny Brotheridge
Danny Brotheridge

Fair play to you, respect for the calmness and ability to multi task under pressure. True Aviator. Well done. Things like this are vital for others to have an insight to, and can help in the long run should the unfortunate happen to them. Thanks for sharing.

2018-10-22
Brian Lambert
Brian Lambert

I recall supporting your decision to return from the islands (Bahamas?) on a Pan some years ago for which you got a lot of criticism. For me seeing your reasonning for that decision alongside this one is illuminating. I applaud your decision in both instances. As I recall the nature of the issue in the first gave you cause to anticipate that the engine could fail - but no reason to suspect either a catastrophic failure or a sudden loss of comms - hence I thought the Pan status perfectlly appropriate. In this video the issue suggested a possible catastrophic failure (fire) or sudden loss of Comms. Hence Mayday the perfect call. Congrats sir. Love your videos even though they make me insanely jealous!

2018-10-20
Mid-day_ Light
Mid-day_ Light

I diagnose your emergency was caused by a faulty mechanic. Replace

2018-10-19
Jack Trudel
Jack Trudel

Wow. Very educational video, Niko. Don't know if you were told to shed loads before flying back to Chi-town or not, but doing that for the return trip after the fact was IMO the second most important lesson you shared today. Had to edit this because the first was getting down alive! In the initial emergency the short in the cabling manifested in fluctuations in instrument readouts. The SR-22's alternator was only one of many suspects. It had sounded like a problem with a voltage regulator or a bridge rectifier. Alternators produce AC, or alternating current. A bridge rectifier circuit converts it to DC, the direct current needed for the plane's avionics. The VR has overvoltage protection to prevent burning out the sensitive avionics circuitry. The BR is simply a bank of diodes organized in a circuit to affect the DC conversion and the loss of just one diode could have caused this fluctuation in the voltage and amperage and static in the comm system. Same deal with the alternator. Not only hard to diagnose when your main concern is survival and getting down, but also in making the return trip. Even with the knowledge that it was causally related to a shorted cable you had no way of actually knowing what else was smoke tested and damaged in the ordeal. As always, well done, sir.

2018-10-19
Shawn Sutter
Shawn Sutter

Hey Niko....I haven't been YT in a while but it is nice seeing you. Sorry to hear about your inflight emergency but you remained calm and tried to work the issue. You did an outstanding job at communicating your issue with ATC. As a student pilot, I obtained a great deal of information from your real emergency. Thank you for sharing.

2018-10-20
Philip Bowen
Philip Bowen

I lost all electrics on an international flight a few years back between Swaziland and South Africa. I was extremely grateful that my delta wing days made me always carry a backup radio and always have my flight plan printed out on my knee and not rely on the GPS etc. Well done on the calm handling of the situation

2018-10-22
Robert Passarelli
Robert Passarelli

Since we had already talked about this I was looking forward to this Vlog, but what you told me about this situation wasn't as serious as this vlog shows. As always, you made the correct choice, safe and not sorry... Safety first, and always...

2018-10-19
Charles Davenport
Charles Davenport

Gotta say first thought was handheld transceiver but I must admit, even thought I carry one every flight, I’ve never actually used it in flight (I guess I just hoped that it would work in a situation like yours). I’ve always figured that along with ForeFlight (both completely independent of any aircraft system) they would make a pretty good “just in case” system. Nicely handled (and love all the videos!)

2018-10-19
Terry Rutherford
Terry Rutherford

1st Thank you for another great video. You, Seveo1kinivo, Flightchops, Aviation 101 have inspired me to get back into flying. I found your decision making perfect. No one should be afraid of declaring an emergency. ATC wants to help and take care of you. Good Call Niko!

2018-10-22
Shawn Sutter
Shawn Sutter

As former Weapons Technician on F-16's, I can't tell you how many times we see wire chaffing and grounded wiring against a metal surface. Niko, you handled it like a champ....Again, great job...

2018-10-20
NWBackcountry
NWBackcountry

When in doubt, always declare an emergency. Well done.

2018-10-22
Brian Sims
Brian Sims

No alternator no battery, no radios no problem, great job handling so much happening at once. If that had been a car it would have stop running but thanks to magnetos the plane engine keeps running. Good Job Niko.

2018-10-21
Jim Thames
Jim Thames

I think the concern of fire justified declaring emergency and discontinuing flight, even if it were forecasted VFR en route. Miss Gracie must be aware you are trading up and getting rid of her. Acting just like a woman!

2018-10-19
HMIC
HMIC

I'm no pilot, but I can drive a car. And whenever the dashboad, radio, air conditioning or engine RPM start acting funny, screw work.. deviate to the mechanic or stop and check the battery. Big fan !! I subbed after I watched your instrumentation test!! Keep those videos rollin!!! :D

2018-10-19
David Hancox
David Hancox

Correct call and a good job! Was there much paperwork due to calling a mayday?

2018-10-19
bob4jjjj
bob4jjjj

Take care in the skies.

2018-10-19
davecat1458
davecat1458

I will fly with you anytime!

2018-10-19
Tom Smith
Tom Smith

See... forget all that computer crap and just FLY THE DAMN PLANE!!!

2018-10-22
landon sock
landon sock

I agree with rest of comments, why would anyone want to wait and see if it gets worse? Land and evaluate well Done Nikko

2018-10-19
blued8107
blued8107

Niko, after going through your emergency procedures what led you to believe you may have had a potential fire. Did you smell smoke or was it part of the emergency procedures for the aircraft?

2018-10-20
Stan Nance
Stan Nance

I was wondering when, or if, we would see this video. I saw the 7700 code come up for N712RA on my "flightradar24" app. I tracked your flight and saw that you made a successful landing. Awesome job! I find it hard to critique anybody in this situation. You were the one seeing the instruments, hearing and feeling your plane. Handled perfectly for your unique situation. We have the luxury of watching and knowing something is definitely wrong, so our call may be different. Congratulations on a successful flight!

2018-10-19
Allen Newport
Allen Newport

Good call

2018-10-19
Pat Cicerchi
Pat Cicerchi

Just curious Niko, why did you use only essential power if the alt cable was no longer an issue? Just being extra cautious?

2018-10-19
gary wheeler
gary wheeler

Never fail to learn from your videos, large or small I take something away from each episode. Thank you from a low time new pilot.

2018-10-20
Keith miner
Keith miner

Well done Niko but surely not a Mayday situation I would have thought Pan would be more appropriate.

2018-10-22
mb2308
mb2308

Handled that like a BOSS!!! period.

2018-10-20
nagle007
nagle007

Nicely done, electrical fire is one of my worst fears while flying.

2018-10-19
Delenor Wilson
Delenor Wilson

I think you handled it very well, you still were able to aviate, navigate and communicate dispiate having a real world emergency and your only mistake was the wrong airport on your callout. Job well done.

2018-10-19
Eduardo Chaves
Eduardo Chaves

Safety first! Do not be shy. Declare May Day was the right attitude, and sharing the experience helps everyone. Static like this, we now know, is linked to the loss of electrical insulation.

2018-10-20
Ellexis
Ellexis

Niko, You demonstrated how keeping a cool and level head lead to effective problem solving and decision making. This is a wonderful example of a PIC being just that; a Pilot In Command. And good gracious Miss Grace! Enough repairs already! Any more and we're gonna pass a love offering basket around to help Niko out! Seriously Niko, you're the best!

2018-10-19
Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll

clear skies and you declare because of an elec problem? Something about this guy makes him easy to not like. My gut feeling is that he's in over his head. A well equipped airplane won't make decisions for you. Still takes a pilot with experience to work the equipment. Won't be watching any more of his videos.

2018-10-23
S S
S S

Niko, you did the right thing… get on the ground as soon as possible. I know from experience working with electrical systems that alternators are capable of putting out over 100 A and shorted to ground could result in a very catastrophic fire. Looking at your picture of the alt output wire.......luckily there was a minimum amount of wiring in the bundle that shorted!

2018-10-19
Peter N
Peter N

Well done Niko! I'm in agreement with "Brian Lambert" and many others in the comments below. You were very decisive in declaring an emergency AND you were very assertive in carrying it through. Any electrical problem which manifests itself over a wide range of unrelated systems carries a high risk of fire and FIRE SPREADS FAST. I also liked how you radioed your intentions just incase ATC can hear you even if you are having trouble hearing them. Also selecting 7700 on the transponder as this highlights you on all ATC displays and allows them to clear traffic out of your way much faster. How to improve? well that's tricky but I will give it a go by saying it would be even better if you were spatially aware at all times where your nearest emergency landing runway is. Finally I would like you to know that I would be a very happy passenger flying with you in command.

2018-10-20
George Allen
George Allen

Nice Job! You definitely showed great PIC decision making in your situation. As you ask in your video if there was anything different if it were me. I probably wouldn't of made a Mayday call bc to me that's a call I would make for engine failure or confirmed engine/electrical fire. With that said I definitely would have declared the emergency and also I noticed that in the video you requested a decent after you already declared the emergency. You really could have descended whenever you wanted and gave ATC a courtesy call bc you already declared the emergency. Remember you can deviate from any FAR in an emergency to assure the best outcome. But that's just me personally. It was a great and safe outcome for you and I'm glad Miss Grace is back in the air to continue making great videos. Your definitely in my top 3 flying channels on here including flight chops, and steveo1kinevo.

2018-10-20
Rishi
Rishi

Handled the situation in a clear, responsible way, like a pro!

2018-10-19
ExtremeRecluse
ExtremeRecluse

The repair shop should have noticed the obvious. I don't you will be taking your plane there any more.

2018-10-19
Robert Kaindl
Robert Kaindl

With consideration to exclusive glass cockpits actually concerns me. Like most, I learned on steam gages so it’s an easy backup. The FAA is considering removing VOR’s and etc. Europe have or is removing ADF and VOR approaches. Relying completely on GPS [i believe] is short sighted. What if? The system goes down? NASA isn’t what it once was... and, we (USA) now need/rely on Russian’s to get into [maned] space travel... it’s a fragile system with limited ways to service our satellites and WAAS systems. That being said, older aircraft are happily being forced to systems like the G600 txi in order to keep up with newer aircraft. Older aircraft (and their pilots) have the option to pack updates in with extra backup security with the usual ADF, VOR’s and other “old school” confidence building backups I’ve/we’ve known to learn and love. Even if I have to mount them accompanied as a hood ornament. I was relieved when you made your turn and I didn’t see any trailing smoke... of course, I knew everything turned out for you because, let’s face it, you wouldn’t have posted anything if it didn’t. as they say “the only time it’s bad to have too much fuel is when your on fire”...

2018-10-21
Fritz Kocher
Fritz Kocher

Nerves of steel!

2018-10-22
jakelonganbach
jakelonganbach

Crazy intense! Glad everything worked out ok. Great job!

2018-10-19
Rishi
Rishi

It has to be said: thank you for sharing the full experience, including your comments. May it serve as a guidance to as many pilots as possible. That they can learn from your experience, what to watch out for and what the correct decision process is.

2018-10-19
The Midnite Rider
The Midnite Rider

Outstanding job!!! You handled the crisis like a real pro.. This video could be used as a great learning tool for pilots.

2018-10-20
Gary ONeil
Gary ONeil

You did a good job . I had the exact same problem in my Columbia 350...it was a faulty box issue. Suggestion, stay high until you get to the airport, then circle down right over the airport. Your turn to downwind looked way wide for the issue you were facing - again, stay close to the airport. Altitude gives you options. As I'm sure you know, problems are usually a chain of failures...you might have sorted out your problem sooner...they hardly get better while you're in the air. A hand-held radio is a MUST HAVE. If you were in Class B you would have had a lot more to deal with. All-in-all you did a good job.

2018-10-22
kingkoolkata
kingkoolkata

OMG nicely done mr. I had the EXACT same Problem except just after the alt 1 quitted the alt no 2 also tripped the cb. All screens except the pfd and com 1 went blank. It was an actual checkflight under ifr conditions. Thankfully the next suitable airport was only 12 minutes away. The plane was grounded for 5 month an the litteraly changed everything on the elec powersystem. But still, I don‘t trust that plane anymore. But again, nicely done! Good job!

2018-10-22
96ChevyDually6.5L
96ChevyDually6.5L

I would have handled it the same way and got down quickly.. Nice job Niko

2018-10-19
wd9igy
wd9igy

Absolutely the right decision. Severe static crashes like that and instrument fluctuations are very indicative of electrical arcing and possibility of an inflight fire. Well done.

2018-10-19
Paulie Walnuts
Paulie Walnuts

Since I've been watching your vids you have had nothing but problems with Miss Grace. I'd get rid of her and get yourself a Mini Cooper or something.

2018-10-19
Joey Torres
Joey Torres

Great Job!!!! I have been watching your vids for so long even before I became a student pilot. I do have question. You know that as a student pilot you are drilled on paper charts and planning your flight. With that said, were you prepared to find an airport without help from ATC? I was waiting for the radio to just stop working!!! This was another great learning video.

2018-10-19
Where Nerdy is Cool!
Where Nerdy is Cool!

Looking forward to seeing the resolution/fix for all of this! Learning from you, I should add a hand held transceiver to my flight bag. I already carry two high capacity batteries as back ups to the iPad just in case (comes in handy for smartphone and GoPros too)

2018-10-22
Peter Robst
Peter Robst

Can hear better if there wasn't any music.

2018-10-23
Tom F
Tom F

Very interesting to watch. I could see your mind racing and it didn't take you long to make the right call. Unfortunate and scary incident. Besides the good outcome, you can also say that you landed at Dick VanDyke's hometown.

2018-10-20
Austin Batrouni
Austin Batrouni

These cirrus always break down lol

2018-10-21
SKB SKB
SKB SKB

Brings back Lots of memories of going to the Joliet airport with my grandfather and flying all over Illinois. Loved hanging out at the office too! That was 1980s!

2018-10-23
hpux735
hpux735

One thing I might have tried is turning off Alt1 first, and seeing it that improved the situation. Then if it didn't, I'd turn off Bat1. The hope would have been that there was something wrong with only the Main bus, and that by isolating it (turning it off) I'd loose the MFD and GPS2, but I'd probably be better off overall. But, I still probably would not have continued the flight. Nice work.

2018-10-22
Michael Savino
Michael Savino

I'm sure your hands were full during this situation however I think this warranted a PAN-PAN emergency.

2018-10-20
Kiwi Flier
Kiwi Flier

That was awesome. Not the fact that something broke, but watching someone recognize that an issue was developing, try to work out what it could potentially mean, and then make a decision based on that. I also liked the fact that you told ATC what you needed and what you were going to do so that they could do their best to help you. When I'm up in my little C152 in a few days I'll definitely be thinking about this. Thanks for sharing.

2018-10-22
ItzDavie
ItzDavie

Excellent job given the circumstances

2018-10-23
Terence Cottington
Terence Cottington

You did the right thing. Stayed calm, investigated what you could whilst in the air, then declared the emergency. Text book...Well done. So glad you made it down safely.

2018-10-19
bicanroman
bicanroman

Good job👍👍

2018-10-24
Fly JFY
Fly JFY

Perfect ADM! Well Done!

2018-10-19
ExtremeRecluse
ExtremeRecluse

As soon as you noticed the problems, turning back to the repair facility would have been my choice. But, I am not their in your position. Thank God you made it to Terra Firma before things got any worse.

2018-10-19
Massimiliano Chiani
Massimiliano Chiani

Bravo, Bravo, Bravo ! Just this

2018-10-19
Indoor and Outdoor Endurance
Indoor and Outdoor Endurance

This was interesting! I watched the whole video all the way through! I live in Illinois.

2018-10-20
American Explorer
American Explorer

I'm glad you made it down safely. Very well done!

2018-10-19
Mindlab780 Ab
Mindlab780 Ab

Wow! I haven’t been online in a while and the first thing pops up is this! Amazing 😉. Awesome job.. stay safe ✌🏼

2018-10-19
chetvilla
chetvilla

wow! thank you for sharing. handled it like a pro.

2018-10-19
ahmad samadzai
ahmad samadzai

Glad you made it sound and safe. I would have just gotten into fetal position and deployed the CAPS. lol.

2018-10-19
Randy Carlson
Randy Carlson

Well done sir!

2018-10-19
partyguy35
partyguy35

Love your videos! Glad to see a new one! God Bless and be safe!

2018-10-19
Joe Suarez
Joe Suarez

Great job... being an EE, as soon as I heard the alt whine, for me, it would have been time to put it down and find the problem.

2018-10-19
Robert Kaindl
Robert Kaindl

We always fall back on our training... should be second nature. Having the courage to calmly follow through and decisively Mayday / 7700 is completely admirable. Please follow up with the FAA requests for declaring an emergency as a learning opportunity. I believe you won’t have any adverse issues since your situation expanded with video proof. Your decisions are to be admired and embraced. Congratulations on using good judgement. I hope, I am able to follow in spades if need be...

2018-10-20
Andrew Small
Andrew Small

Has this guy had plastic surgery on his face? Either that or he got punched.

2018-10-22
Rick Ewart
Rick Ewart

You made the right call Niko! Declare Early and get all the help you can.

2018-10-19
angel living
angel living

Wow, you are so calm when there's emergencies. I love watching your flights and see how you solve the problems. Your so responsible and take no chances. Way to go Niko! Much prayers for you in the air. \0/

2018-10-20
Stephen Lee
Stephen Lee

Wow....! Talk about a calm and focused pilot..! Niko you handled that like a seasoned vet. I'm glad you are safe and nothing catastrophic happened.

2018-10-21
Stan K
Stan K

I would have done as you did, fire is always a concerned moment, you sure have had electrical problems lately. Better luck in the future, owning a plane can get costly.

2018-10-19
Pat Cicerchi
Pat Cicerchi

Well handled sir.

2018-10-19
Benjamin Casey
Benjamin Casey

Great execution and staying calm. Can’t really fault it. Maybe back up hand held radio would be a good precaution. But amazing effort

2018-10-22
Doug Thomas
Doug Thomas

Good job Brother.

2018-10-30
Terry Curtin
Terry Curtin

Smart and alive. Burning planes crash fast.

2018-10-30
steve AUSTIN
steve AUSTIN

I would have declared an emergency too many pilots are reluctant to do so for fear of repercussions. Like your videos and glad all turned out well. One recommendation please don’t say flash coming at you or flash in the box. FAA and controllers dislike this immensely. Stick with standard phraseology – If you listen long enough to most frequencies, you will hear radio chatter that has nothing to do with the official AIM Pilot/Controller Glossary. When learning ATC communications, the drive is often to “sound like everyone else” on the radio with comments like “here’s the flash”, or “3.5 in the box”, or my personal favorite “we’ve got’em on the fish finder” (reference to TCAS). For more items in this category, see John Zimmerman’s article on The 7 deadly sins of radio communication The 7 deadly sins of radio communications is another good read, thank you for replying.

2018-10-29
Tony Merlot
Tony Merlot

Good you didn't need to deploy the chute! $$$

2018-10-22
Stewart Campbell
Stewart Campbell

While not a pilot, I follow aviation very closely. It seems to me you followed the classic military flight training instruction of aviate, navigate, communicate - it could have been easy to get caught up in the emergency versus staying focused on flying. I'm sure you've post-briefed this yourself but you were fairly close to Champaign which likely could have fixed your Cirrus - but, I also agree with the decision to fly back to PWK and sort it out there. I do agree also with the decision to just get straight down to the ground ASAP. One thing I did notice - there was a noticeable vibration in your camera shots, especially the wide go pro shot that looks across the cockpit at you - were you experiencing roughness too? Or was the varying prop RPM causing that (or was that just weird instrumentation brought on my the flucutating voltage and electrical noise from the shorting alternator?). Well, you sure could see the concern on your face. Definitely VERY smart in declaring an emergency. I live 5 miles from PWK - next time your travels bring you there, would love to meet you. Good luck and keep on flying and giving us this great content.

2018-10-23
Larry Barrett
Larry Barrett

Danville not far from Terre Haute

2018-10-29
Philip Gibbs
Philip Gibbs

Well done...and good decisions made! Fortunately the wx was good and an instrument approach wasnt called for, plus in the US there are airfields all around, and plenty of knowlegeable, helpful controllers..PLUS you are flying a modern, well euipped aircraft. Here in Zambia...all of the above are not in abundance, and thoughts of emergency procedures are constantly to mind!Well done once again on a well put together video!

2018-10-22
Captian Sanders
Captian Sanders

Really enjoy flying with you, I always learn something new and important. Thanks!!!

2018-10-29
Hunter Esp
Hunter Esp

What is this like the fourth "IN FLIGHT EMERGENCY" video from this channel in what looks to be new airplanes.

2018-10-30
Michael Goodman
Michael Goodman

I’m glad that you kept watching out your windows. I was flying about 2 months ago when a cirrus lost all displays and they were concentrating on trying to fix it while flying in the circuit. They came to within about 50ft or less of us and were completely oblivious to the fact that they nearly killed all 3 of us (him, my instructor and me) when he eventually was able to contact the control tower, the air traffic controller gave him a stern telling off for the near miss we reported minutes before and he came in shocked and apologetic saying he didn’t see us. This isn’t the first near miss but this one was similar to yours. Glad you made it out of that safely.

2018-10-23
David Rumolo
David Rumolo

Great job! Calling Mayday was the right thing to do when dealing with unknown issues. Mayday provides another layer of safety. Have a feeling that the critics of your decision have nothing but Flight Sim time....no need to call mayday from a desk!

2018-10-22
C Jorgenson
C Jorgenson

I am currently under contract to purchase a nearly identical G2-GTS, and your videos are very exciting to me. Can't hardly stand to wait until I can get transition training and Cirrus Embark and start flying her. Liked the dramatic music you put in the background as you declared the emergency and landed under rather stressful conditions, a nice professional touch to the video. Don't know how much you are into the electrical system of the aircraft. Did you try selectively turning OFF the system 1 (battery and alternator) and then system 2? A very interesting issue you had, gave me a chance to "troubleshoot" your issue using the wiring diagram and therefore learn more about how the power is distributed from the 4 sources (2 batteries and 2 alternators) and the various buses. Based on finding the wire from alternator 1 shorting to ground through a chafed area of the wire, I would think that once system one (both bat and alt) were turned OFF, power to that wire would be removed. Then everything that remained powered (most equipment would then be powered from sys 2) would be working normally without the static. System 2 would then be able to carry you through for a relatively short time till emergency landing. But, OMG, no air conditioning! LOL I was wondering if the alternator replacement was precautionary or had it been burned or overheated by the serious short to ground? There was also the possibility of battery overheat. During the event, if you tried turning off the no.1 alternator, the wire would still be powered from the no.1 battery and would still be sparking and barking, so the entire no.1 system (battery and alternator) would have to be deactivated. The problem was with the no.1 system, meaning that the no.2 system would still be available which actually allows just about everything except the AC, cabin air and fan, 12VDC outlet, and the MFD to operate. But, the limited capacity of the no.2 system (small alternator and small battery) could possibly cause the no.2 battery to be drained over the course of a longer flight if everything was left powered. You then (as you did) would need to deactivate everything that was not essential, and selectively power up systems as you actually needed them. Certainly glad that shorting wire didn't cause a more serious issue such as a fire. I noted that the photo of the new alternator showed that the offending wire had not been replaced. Obviously, the repair/modification to the wire routing/clamp installation made the system safe, but I would have recommended also replacing the entire wire as it is a critical piece. Had that issue been induced by the previous work you had done on the aircraft? This brings to mind that the pilot should carefully inspect the aircraft after any work is performed. Not that you suspect poor work, but because of the fact that sometimes somebody misses something and another set of eyes might catch it. I bet in the future you will make sure all wiring is properly tied clamped and secured to prevent vibration from causing chafing.

2018-10-20
Clayton Roney
Clayton Roney

I have had this happen before. Because I also fly antique aircraft . I always keep everything printed, also I cary a GPS and my iPad and a hand held radio. Because one of the aircraft I fly has no electrical I would not see this situation as an emergency in VFR conditions. I would revert to my electric flight bag and find the nearest airport. If I couldn’t reach that tower on ships radio or handheld, I would call them on the phone with my position, then contact them on my handheld at 5 miles out. Declaring an emergency is never the wrong thing to do.

2018-10-23